Housing Finance in Côte d’Ivoire

Overview

This profile is also available in French here.

 

To download a PDF full version of the 2021 Côte d’Ivoire country profile, click here.

Côte d’Ivoire is a West African country with an estimated population of 27 175 800 as of 2021. The main cities are Abidjan, the economic capital, and Yamoussoukro, the political capital. The country is made up of four regions and enjoys an equatorial and southern savanna climate. Slightly over half of its population, approximately 51.3%, lives in urban areas. With its growing population, the Government of Côte d’Ivoire faces tremendous challenges around access to the property and secured land. Informal housing is common in urban and peri-urban areas and these informal houses are usually built on publicly owned land.

Since 2012 the country has enjoyed vibrant economic growth at an annual rate of 8%. However, COVID-19 has dampened economic growth, with contractions recorded in key economic sectors such as agriculture at -2.2%, forestry at -16.5%, and petroleum products at -26.9%. Consequently, in 2020 real gross domestic product (GDP) was 1.8%, well below the 6.23% recorded in 2019.  Inflation reached 1.8% due to higher food and transport prices. Even though inflation is high compared to 2019 (0.8%), inflation remains under control and under the Central Bank of West African States (BCEAO) 3% threshold.

The construction sector remains one of the pillars of the country’s national economy, and in 2019 it was one of the main drivers of growth. However, due to the pandemic, the sector’s growth slowed, as did the national housing sector. This was due to many factors, including COVID-19, which heightened the level of financial insecurity among many households. In 2020 the number of rental and sale property transactions declined, and many construction projects were halted. Given the reported strong dependence on the informal sector in the national economy, access to housing finance from traditional financial institutions has proved challenging, especially for those deriving their income from the informal sector. The 2021 census, which was due to start in November, will seek to provide up-to-date information and data on demographics, household structure, and expenditures, spatial repartition, social and economic characteristics of the country to help the government tailor better policies and responses to the national housing challenge.

Find out more information on the housing finance sector of Cote d’Ivoire, including key stakeholders, important policies, and housing affordability:


Each year, CAHF publishes its Housing Finance in Africa Yearbook. The profile above is from the 2021 edition, which has up-to-date profiles for 55 African countries.

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