Housing Finance in Libya

Overview

This profile is also available in French here.

To download a pdf version of the full 2021 Libya country profile, click here.

A decade of political instability and recurring wars in Libya has created a major humanitarian crisis including internal displacement and lack of access to basic needs and adequate housing. With a population of around 6.91 million, including 585 000 migrants and refugees and more than 447 000 internally displaced persons (IDPs). Informal settlements have multiplied, straining the public utility network and basic service provision. Libya’s population is predominantly urban (80.69%) with an urbanisation rate of 1.74% in 2021. There is no recent official data on the housing deficit. However, even before 2011 there was a large housing deficit and this has been aggravated by the war. The effects of COVID-19 is compounded by the fact that Libya has a higher risk factor of infection due to widespread population displacement and the increase in informal settlements. With the absence of adequate housing, water and health facilities, the country remains vulnerable to COVID-19.

On 23 October 2020, Libya celebrated a ceasefire agreement which halted hostilities between the competing governments and military forces and paved the way for new executive authorities facilitated by United Nations Support Mission in Libya). In March 2021, the new Government of National Unity (GNU) was established and replaced the Government of National Accord (GNA) and the parallel eastern cabinet. The government is designed to last until December 2021 when Libyans are meant to freely elect the next administration. All the key domestic actors, including General Khalifa Haftar, have endorsed the Libya Political Dialogue Forum, the process through which the new authorities were selected. The role of the GNU is to launch a national reconciliation programme and prepare the elections. There is hope for reconciliation as, for the first time since 2011, the political dialogues have been inclusive, and have included women, youth, tribes, ethnic groups, and even the supporters of former regime of Muammar Gaddafi. The so called “greens” are also included.

Find out more information on the housing finance sector of Libya, including key stakeholders, important policies and housing affordability:

 


Each year, CAHF publishes its Housing Finance in Africa Yearbook. The profile above is from the 2021 edition, which has up-to-date profiles for 55 African countries.

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